Nokia offers augmented reality job search

Published: 26 July 2013 y., Friday

Mobile phone giant Nokia is enlisting Britain’s young entrepreneurs to build new businesses using its career services app, JobLens. Launched in June, JobLens is a Windows Phone 8 app that helps users search for jobs in their local area. The app uses augmented reality to show the user exactly where the job is in relation to their current location, and display information about the company.

It also taps into the user’s social networking profiles – including LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Windows Live – to identify friends who may be able to connect them with the hiring manager. .

At an event in London today, Nokia will give 30 budding entrepreneurs from the Entrepreneur First not-for-profit programme a detailed overview of the JobLens app, and challenge them to build new businesses.

Business Secretary Vince Cable said the programme as a laudable example of collaboration designed to help move the UK economy back to full employment.

Šaltinis: dailytelegraph.com
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